Saudi national Homaidan Al-Turki was convicted in an American court, nearly four years ago, of an array of crimes involving his (and his wife’s) treatment of a servant they had brought to the US. Among the crimes for which he was convicted were 12 felony counts of unlawful sexual contact with use of force (i.e., ‘rape’), one felony count of criminal extortion and one felony count of theft. He also was found guilty of two misdemeanors: false imprisonment and conspiracy to commit false imprisonment.

Al-Turki and his family claim that this is all due to a ‘cultural misunderstanding’ of ‘traditional Saudi ways’ or simply ‘Islamophobia’. In fighting against his conviction, his attorneys have appealed to various levels of the US courts. The latest appeal, to the US Supreme Court, has been denied, The Washington Post reports:

Court won’t give Saudi citizen new trial

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court won’t hear an appeal from a Saudi Arabian citizen who blamed anti-Muslim sentiment for his conviction for keeping his housekeeper a virtual slave.

The high court on Monday turned away an appeal from Homaidan Al-Turki. He was convicted of false imprisonment, conspiracy, criminal extortion, theft and unlawful sexual contact.

Al-Turki was convicted of sexually abusing his Indonesian housekeeper and paying her less than $2 per day.

He complained that he wasn’t allowed to question a potential juror about potential anti-Muslim sentiment.

The case is Al-Turki v. Colorado, 09-700.


April:06:2010 - 08:17 | Comments & Trackbacks (17) | Permalink
17 Responses to “End of Appeals for Homaidan Al-Turki”
  1. 1
    Christopher Burgess Said:
    April:06:2010 - 13:39 

    Thanks for sharing this John; domestic servants are amongst the most vulnerable – good to see one who abuses the employer-employee relationship brought to task.

    All the best
    Chris

  2. 2
    Chiara Said:
    April:06:2010 - 18:00 

    Psychopaths usually blame someone else, a lack of normal moral development, including accepting responsibility is a hallmark of their psyche and behaviour. Sad that some people will believe this false claim that this is normal Saudi behaviour towards domestic help.

  3. 3
    John Burgess Said:
    April:06:2010 - 18:09 

    The most disconcerting part is that his family back in the KSA believes all the arguments against his guilt, too.

  4. 4
    Chiara Said:
    April:06:2010 - 19:12 

    In my experience family will say whatever to defend their loved one, especially traditional families. Family loyalty trumps individual beliefs.

  5. 5
    Daisy Said:
    April:06:2010 - 22:26 

    Hi Christopher,
    Are you some relation to John?

    Your blog is very meaningful.

  6. 6
    John Burgess Said:
    April:06:2010 - 22:33 

    Chris is my youngest brother. And a very good guy!

  7. 7
    Daisy Said:
    April:06:2010 - 22:47 

    Yes, naturally – he has a fine example to emulate in you! :-)

    He is doing good work.

    Please ask him to activate the Name/URL option in the comment section of his blog, as that’s the easiest option to use on Blogger.

  8. 8
    Sparky Said:
    April:07:2010 - 01:50 

    Hi Chris!

    I couldn’t agree more that it is indeed a very gratifying experience seeing the one abusing the employee-employer relationship brought to task. With this particular case, I had wished if Homaidan were innocent to be set free but hey didn’t work out thata way.

    Can you imagine that some American employers in Saudi believe that that they can abuse and exploit workers and say words to Jordanian and Egyptians such as, “If I say to you stand on your head, you will.” That type of language certainly constitutes abuse and must not be tolerated.

    I sure hope that Saudi Arabia will begin to more and more call to accountability employers who abuse and exploit workers .

  9. 9
    Sparky Said:
    April:07:2010 - 03:31 

    Good news “US approves of killing an American cleric” http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/36208306/ns/world_news-the_new_york_times

    Regardless of nationality no one should be immune when it comes to being held accountable for wrongdoing.

    :-)

  10. 10
    oby Said:
    April:07:2010 - 14:50 

    I agree with Sparky…American or not if you conspire to harm others you need to be held accountable.

    I think this quote from the article is a perfect example of how free speech has turned into something else that can be actionable by the USA;

    “The danger Awlaki poses to this country is no longer confined to words,” said an American official, who like other current and former officials interviewed for this article spoke of the classified counterterrorism measures on the condition of anonymity. “He’s gotten involved in plots.”

  11. 11
    John Burgess Said:
    April:07:2010 - 15:30 

    Yes indeed… when words evolve into actions, then they become legally (and militarily) sanctionable.

  12. 12
    Solomon2 Said:
    April:08:2010 - 10:49 

    So Turki remains in a Colorado state prison. Yet this is still an unusual case – the Saudi gov’t spent a lot of money on teams of lawyers and the Co. attorney general was dispatched to the KSA to explain himself and the case. Why have so many strings been pulled for this low-life?

  13. 13
    John Burgess Said:
    April:08:2010 - 11:07 

    I don’t have his family tree available.

  14. 14
    Sparky Said:
    April:08:2010 - 22:53 

    @13 that is a A + + answer

  15. 15
    Ahmed Said:
    September:01:2010 - 02:15 

    The best thing Saudi Government, should do is:
    1. Ask US Government transfer him to Saudi Judiciary.
    2. Saudi Government must agree to accept the validity of the evidence as presented in US courts.
    3. Saudi Government must apply to fullest extent of Sharia Punishments to Al Turki (which means death by stoning :) )

    The Saudi Government must do the above to restore its honor and confidence to the international community.

    And the Saudi Government and Saudi’s must stop playing the devils advocate.

  16. 16
    Syed Husssain Aleem Said:
    September:01:2010 - 02:25 

    The best thing Saudi Government, should do is:
    1. Ask US Government transfer him to Saudi Judiciary.
    2. Saudi Government must agree to accept the validity of the evidence as presented in US courts.
    3. Saudi Government must apply to fullest extent of Sharia Punishments to Al Turki (which means death by stoning )

    The Saudi Government must do the above to restore its honor and confidence to the international community.

    And the Saudi Government and Saudi’s must stop playing the devils advocate.

  17. 17
    Syed Husssain Aleem Said:
    September:01:2010 - 06:29 

    i just came across this arab news article and was disgusted by it.
    http://arabnews.com/saudiarabia/article121567.ece
    Some Saudis and a so called Sheikh Salmaan Al Oudah are lobbying Obama to release the rapist and maid abuser Homaidan al Turki who thankfully has been incarcerated for 28 years in Colorado for his crimers.
    Homaidan probably thought that he can get away with raping and abusing his maid in US just like in Saudi, and thankfully justice caught up with him there.
    Now i am concerned that Obama being gullible at times as he is may buy into this Saudi Lobbying, so i suggest people go on this youtube page setup for lobbying and leave their comments.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOnoqBsrOjY
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQ0_ckkCpBY
    Thank you

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